Genesee River - Rochester, NY area 

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Consider the environmental importance of the Genesee River, which runs through the city of Rochester, NY    

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Various recreational uses, aquatic life support and aesthetics in urban waterways of the Lower Genesee River are significantly restricted by pollutants from various industrial, municipal, commercial and other sources in the highly-urbanized metropolitan Rochester area and surrounding suburban communities. Nonpoint urban runoff flushes a variety of pollutants and debris into the river. Contaminated sediments, inactive hazardous waste sites and other impacts attributed to past/historic discharges also limit uses. (Page 5, The 2001 Genesee River Basin  Waterbody Inventory and Priority Waterbodies List, Bureau of Watershed Assessment and Research, Division of Water, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation

 


The Genesee River near Lower Falls. Photo by Frank J. Regan.

The Genesee River, which runs through the city of Rochester and dissects there with the Erie Canal, also has its unique ecology and a history of contamination from industry and agricultural run-off. 

There are many environmental issues relating to this river that people still use to canoe, boat, swim on. It even harbors large vessels as the Genesee River meets Lake Ontario. 

Cleaning up the Genesee from centuries of use as a transportation route and drainage for industry should be instrumental before developers begin yet another millennia of use, this time for tourism.

Get the news links and all the resources for this topic. 

(Above scripts from Dynamic Drive)

Genesee River Discussions:

Rochester area discussions on the environmental health of our major river.

  • 6/28/2014 - Major waterways in New York State, including lower Genesee River, heavily polluted by industrial toxic waste.  Let’s face it; we’ve got more problems with our water quality in our region than raw sewage from sporadic sewer overflows.  Why isn’t the local media addressing this issue? Read “Wasting our Waterways. TOXIC INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION AND RESTORING THE PROMISE OF THE CLEAN WATER ACT” Released by: Environment New York Research and Policy Center” Toxic Chemicals Found in New York Waterways New York, NY—Industrial facilities dumped 5,303,190 pounds of toxic chemicals into New York’s waterways in 2012 making New York’s waterways the 15th worst in the nation, according to a new report by Environment New York Research & Policy Center. The “Wasting Our Waters” report comes as the Environmental Protection Agency considers a new rule to restore Clean Water Act protections to thousands of waterways in New York and across the nation. "New York's waterways should be clean -- for swimming, drinking, and supporting wildlife," said Heather Leibowitz, the Director of Environment New York. "But too often, our waters have become a dumping ground for polluters. The first step to curb this tide of toxic pollution is to restore Clean Water Act protections to all our waterways." Environment New York Research & Policy Center’s report on toxic pollutants discharged into America’s waters is based on data reported by polluting facilities to the EPA’s Toxics Release Inventory for 2012, the most recent data available. (June 19, 2014) Environment New York [more on Water Quality and Genesee River in our area]
  • Water quality concerns for Rochester, NY’s Local Waterfront Revitalization Program The due date for public comment for Rochester, NY’s Local Waterfront Revitalization Program (LWRP) comes to an end this December. You can complete a survey and/or submit a comment online here: Rochester LWRP Update. The description of the program is as follows from the City of Rochester: “The purpose of this project is to update the city’s LWRP and expand the boundary of the plan to include all of the city’s waterfront areas along Lake Ontario, the Genesee River and the Erie Canal.” The ten questions on the survey mostly contain a wish-list of projects to make life more appealing to those who visit, live, or want to develop along our city’s waterfronts.  Stuff like creating a skate park, more fishing sites, more bars and restaurants, more residential homes, and more trails figure large. And then there is a project peculiar to our city, and I suspect wildly expensive, the ‘re-watering the old Erie Canal through downtown’.  There’s also the Garden Ariel loop project that would “Through stewardship, innovative design, and community outreach to preserve natural and historic resources, and cultivate High Falls transformation into a world-class public green space.”  [December 2013] more...
  • 3/21/2012 - Hope for the Genesee River: The Genesee Rivers has been given some negative news lately, as it has been named the 32nd worst toxic polluted river in the US according to this report: Wasting Our Waterways 2012 Toxic Industrial Pollution and the Unfulfilled Promise of the Clean Water Act Released by: Environment America Research and Policy Center  Release date: Thursday, March 22, 2012 > Read News Release > Download Report (PDF).  Read more about that here and a host of articles on this story: Not news: Genesee River (which runs through Rochester, NY) ranked 32nd most polluted river in the US.  However, all may not be lost to recover the environmental health of our river, check out this photo essay” Improving Conservation Strategy for the Neglected Upper Genesee River” by Genesee River Wilds www.geneseeriverwilds.org
  • 3/26/2012 - Not news: Genesee River (which runs through Rochester, NY) ranked 32nd most polluted river in the US.  Back in 1998, when I first began RochesterEnvironment.com to collect and access all the environmental issues surrounding one community—Rochester, NY—I created a page called Genesee River.  I created it because some major articles and reports had just come out that the river that runs through Rochester, NY was very toxic and polluted.  Here is an entry I posted on my web page back in the day (though none of the links work anymore): more...

 

Learn about Center for Environmental Initiatives’s ‘Genesee RiverWatch Initiative’, a major effort to clean up our waters of the Genesee River, its tributaries and Lake Ontario. Rochester is considering many water-front development projects [Read: Water quality concerns for Rochester, NY’s Local Waterfront Revitalization Program] but to make these project viable the waters that run through them must be clean and healthy. 

The challenge "The Rochester Embayment of Lake Ontario is a federally designated Area of Concern because of a range of concerns including pollution, contaminated sediments, fish consumption advisories and impairment of beneficial use such as beach closings. Many area tributaries to Lake Ontario and the Genesee River do not meet state water quality standards. The beaches of Lake Ontario are closed typically for 30 to 50% of the bathing season because of high bacteria levels and contamination with algae. Development of our lakeshore assets, including the Port of Rochester, is dependent upon a sustained improvement in the near-shore water quality. The challenge to the community is how to reduce contamination of the Lake Ontario and Finger Lakes watersheds from agricultural activities, municipal and industrial wastewater discharges, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems in a cost-effective manner. Improving the water quality in the region's waters will make a vital contribution to improving the quality of life in the area and to the economic and environmental revitalization of the region's lakeshore assets. " -from Center for Environmental Initiatives (www.ceinfo.org)

 

  • Is the Genesee River healthy? Back in the 1990’s this story appeared about our Genesee River: “Genesee River ranks "second among U.S. rivers that had cancer-causing chemicals dumped into them during a recent five-year period"--Rochester Digital Edition” What interesting is that in the subsequent years, no investigative reporting that I know of has done on an in-depth report on the health of the Genesee River?  Rarely is there even an article in any local news about the Genesee River.  So, what does it mean that the Genesee River does not appear the ‘worst’ rivers list in American Rivers (www.americanrivers.org)?  It does not mean that American Rivers or any other environmental group has come to the Genesee River and conducted a full environmental study.  What it does mean that no one has conducted a thorough environmental study on the Genesee River and sent that in to American Rivers.  My point: The Genesee River could be very polluted, maybe one of the most ‘toxic’ polluted rivers in the US.  Who, without doing a compressive study, would know?  The Genesee River was used as a chemical toilet for decades and few I suspect are drinking the water near our (the Rochester region) end of the river.  Without a full testing of all our rivers, we cannot possibly believe that the Genesee River does not belong on anyone’s worst or most polluted list.  One New York river lands on American Rivers Most Endangered List | 520 - An Environmental Blog | Rochester Democrat and Chronicle The Genesee River is not on the American Rivers list of America’s Most Endangered Rivers list, which was released early this morning. But the river that tops the list, the Susquehanna River, stretches into New York. (May 17, 2011) 520 - An Environmental Blog | Rochester Democrat and Chronicle [more on the Genesee River in our area]
  • 12/06/2010 - The Genesee River, how often do we check its health?  Just came across this good article on the state of the Genesee River’s health—from July of 2009.  It was a good find.  Most articles these days on the Genesee River are about how to develop it and make it attractive.  However, the actual health of our main river should be our focus not merely on its aesthetics.  Our river, like most bodies of water in our area (and most other areas in our country) has been the end point of drainage systems for industry, farm run-off, and more.  We should not just assume that the rivers can recover from these assaults naturally, as the stuff often dumped into them was manmade and nothing the rivers ever had to deal with them before.  So, our attention should be constantly on the health of our Genesee River, not just for tourist dollars and floating our boats, but because life lives in rivers and is a part of our region’s ecology.  River's water slowly reviving | democratandchronicle.com | Democrat and Chronicle The Genesee River flows through a dramatic progression of settings on its 160-mile course — forested hills, plains rich with farms, small villages, a large city, and deep gorges featuring spectacular waterfalls and a huge flood-control dam. (July 19, 2009) Democratandchronicle.com | Democrat and Chronicle | Rochester news, community, entertainment, yellow pages and classifieds. Serving Rochester, New York 
  • Genesee River – gauging success Using the Genesee River as a backdrop, New York State Environmental Conservation Commissioner (NYSDEC) Pete Grannis recently celebrated the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. Grannis listed many of the accomplishment of the Genesee River clean up (see State Environmental Commissioner Celebrates Progress along the Genesee River - NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation): more...
  • Care about the Genesee River ? The Genesee River Wilds Project is a coalition of groups and individuals who invest time, energy, funding, and other resources in the development of an environmentally sustainable system of natural parks concentrated along the Genesee River in the “Genesee River Wilds more...
  • News on the Genesee River at Rochester, NY What is becoming clear with this article [There's something fishy in the Genesee - again]and several others, Rochester City Newspaper is now the most important environmental newspaper in our area. Every other media in our area has dropped the ball on the most important issue of the day—the state of our environment. more...

 

Wasting our Waterway 2012Wasting Our Waterways 2012

Toxic Industrial Pollution and the Unfulfilled Promise of the Clean Water Act Released by: Environment America Research and Policy Center

Release date: Thursday, March 22, 2012 > Read News Release > Download Report (PDF)

"Industrial facilities continue to dump millions of pounds of toxic chemicals into America’s rivers, streams, lakes and ocean waters each year – threatening both the environment and human health. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), pollution from industrial facilities is responsible for threatening or fouling water quality in more than 14,000 miles of rivers and more than 220,000 acres of lakes, ponds and estuaries nationwide. " from Environment America

Environment America"Environment America is a federation of state-based, citizen-funded environmental advocacy organizations. We believe there’s something special about our country — and so much worth protecting and preserving for future generations. From stunning waterways like Chesapeake Bay and the Great Lakes, to beloved national parks like Acadia and Mount Rainier, America’s natural wonders enrich our lives in countless ways. "

* Also: Improving Conservation Strategy for the Neglected Upper Genesee River” by Genesee River Wilds www.geneseeriverwilds.org

Genesee River NewsLinks

Though our major river through Rochester doesn't get much media attention, sometimes it does.  I've been following these stories for ten years and this is all I have on the Genesee River.

2014

  • Agencies stock Genesee River with young sturgeon A group of county, state, and federal organizations released more than 1,000 lake sturgeon fingerlings into the Genesee River today.  The fish were hatched in June at the State Department of Environmental Conservation's Oneida fish hatchery. Early this afternoon, a DEC boat took them to Seth Green Island where they were released.  The sturgeon will spend the next 10 to 15 years in the Genesee River before they move on to Lake Ontario, said Dr. Jeff Wyatt, director of animal health and conservation for the Seneca Park Zoo. Mature lake sturgeon are generally three to five feet long, and between 10 and 80 pounds. However, some fish grow much larger. (October 3, 2014) Rochester City Newspaper {more on Wildlife and Genesee River in our area]
  • Kodak number one for releasing most toxic chemicals in New York waterways, study finds According to a June report from Environment New York Research & Policy Center, Eastman Kodak Co. has been named the top discharging facility in 2012, weighted by toxicity concentration, in all of New York State, putting 12,151 pounds of toxic pollution into the Lower Genesee River. In addition, the report found, in 2012, industrial facilities discharged over 5.3 million pounds of toxic chemicals into New York's waterways overall, and Anheuser-Busch Inc. facilities dropped over 1.3 million pounds of toxic waste into the Oswego River in Baldwinsville, N.Y. (July 9, 2014) Minority Reporter [more on Brownfields and Genesee River and Water Quality in our area]
  • DEC Announces That Remediation Activities at Eastman Business Park Will Continue Following Kodak's Bankruptcy Settlement Environmental Trust Established For Cleanup and Monitoring Efforts at the Business Park and Investigation of Genesee River As part of the federal court approval of Kodak's bankruptcy settlement today, the company will create an environmental trust to fund remediation and monitoring activities at the Eastman Business Park (EBP) in Rochester and an investigation to assess whether the Genesee River suffered damages associated with discharges from Kodak's operations, State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens announced. DEC will administer the trust, which is funded by Kodak. "The assessment and mitigation of environmental damage affecting Eastman Business Park and the Genesee River is an important component of Kodak's bankruptcy settlement agreement," Commissioner Martens said. "Governor Andrew Cuomo directed DEC to develop a plan to address environmental issues at the site, which will help to attract prospective developers. The environmental trust fund will ensure the continued cleanup and monitoring of contamination at the business park and provide funding to investigate impacts to the Genesee River. These actions will create a healthier environment to attract economic development and jobs." (May 13, 2014) The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) [more on Genesee River and Brownfields in our area]
  • Kodak Will Create A Trust To Oversee Environmental Work At Eastman Business Park A federal bankruptcy judge on Tuesday gave final approval to a plan  that will see Kodak create an environmental trust to fund environmental work at Eastman Business Park. The agreement also calls for an investigation to assess whether the Genesee River suffered damages associated with discharges from past Kodak operations. (May 13, 2014) WXXI News [more on Brownfields and Genesee River in our area]
  • Mass Meditation Means to Bring Attention to Pollution in the Genesee River Dozens sat in silent midday meditation Tuesday on the Pont de Rennes footbridge in the heart of downtown Rochester.  Meditation was meant to call attention to pollution in the Genesee River without speaking a word. The “Earth Day Earth Vigil” was organized as collaboration between The Lost Bird Project and Rochester Zen Center. Executive Producer of the Lost Bird Project, Andy Stern says not many people know the state of the Genesee River. “In the past, there have been a tremendous amount of toxins dumped into the river. This was largely when there were no regulations at all,” said Stern. “They still remain; many are embedded in the bottom of the river. There's controversy about whether to clean or not, maybe we'll just stir it up and make it worse.” (April 23, 2014) WXXI News [more on Genesee River in our area]
  • Upstate communities tackle pollution in the Genesee River Community members from across western New York came together in Rochester Thursday to address the issue of pollution in the Genesee River, and create an action plan for the immediate future. The summit, run by the Center for Environmental Initiatives, was spurred by a new study which suggests human activity along the Genesee River Basin is having a direct impact on the water quality in Lake Ontario. Lead author of the research, Joe Makarewicz from the College at Brockport, is urging communities to tackle the issue at a local level. He says reducing run off from agricultural activities and wastewater treatment plants would go a long way toward improving water quality (February 6, 2014) Innovation Trail [more on Genesee River in our area]
  • Rochester Hosts Summit to Tackle Pollution in Genesee River Community members from across western New York came together in Rochester Thursday to address the issue of pollution in the Genesee River, and create an action plan for the immediate future. The summit, run by the Center for Environmental Initiatives, was spurred by a new study which suggests human activity along the Genesee River Basin is having a direct impact on the water quality in Lake Ontario. Lead author of the research, Joe Makarewicz from the College at Brockport, is urging communities to tackle the issue at a local level. (February 6, 2014) WXXI News [more on the Genesee River in our area]
  • Study IDs Genesee River pollutants An unusually precise research study has, for the first time, determined the sources of pollutants in the Genesee River — and a Rochester-area organization is convening an open workshop Thursday for people who want to do something about it. The Genesee River Watershed Project, undertaken by environmental scientists from The College at Brockport, used sophisticated computer models to track phosphorus, sediment and other material in the river and its tributaries. The massive study — 755 pages have been published so far, with one part yet to come — is a road map for change that lays out the relative benefits of reducing farm field runoff in one spot or cleaning up sewage treatment plant discharge in another. "It allows you an opportunity from a management perspective to say 'We can develop a plan for the future. Here's where we can get more bang for the buck'," said Joseph C. Makarewicz, a distinguished professor of environmental science at the college and the study's lead author. (February 4, 2014) Rochester Democrat and Chronicle [more on the Genesee River in our area]

* Two page Fact Sheet: The National Rivers and Streams Assessment 2008-2009: A Collaborative Survey "he National Rivers and Streams Assessment (NRSA) is a study of all rivers and streams of the U.S., from the largest “great rivers” to the smallest headwater streams. It was conducted using standard statistical survey techniques: sites were selected at random to represent the condition of all rivers and streams in regions that share similar characteristics. This is the first time a national monitoring study of the overall condition of streams and rivers has been conducted using this statistically-valid approach. State and tribal water quality agencies, with support from EPA, conducted this work using the same methods at all sites to ensure that results can be compared across the country " EPA National Rivers and Streams Assessment

2013

  • Rochester's Lower Falls an angler's paradise Beyond the mist of Lower Falls, at the base of the Genesee River gorge, Ryan Lawrence casts his line into the swift-flowing waters from the edge of the rocky shore. The late fall morning has drawn a dozen other fisherman. Some push closer to the thundering waterfall, and venture into the eddy, while others stake out locations downstream. There, the river is so calm and shallow it is possible to wade well into the channel. On either side, the wooded ravine is a spray of bright fall colors that reflects in the Genesee. The picturesque fishing hole is framed beneath arched supports of the Driving Park bridge some 200 feet above. "I love it in the fall time," says Lawrence, 22, of Penfield, who fishes these waters three times a week this time of year in the hopes of hooking steelhead trout. "A lot of fish come up here. It's a big river. ... (But) you're in the middle of the city. I'm sure not a lot of people even know about it." (November 16, 2013) Rochester Democrat and Chronicle [more on Genesee River in our area]
  • Lake Sturgeon Released into the Genesee River New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) staff and federal and local partners today released 1,000 fingerling lake sturgeon into the Genesee River as part of an effort to restore a healthy population of this native fish species. This event marks the third year a release has taken place. The addition of these young fish to the Genesee River will increase the chance that the river will once again be the home to a re-established and thriving Lake Sturgeon population. "This project clearly demonstrates how great partnerships and good science together have contributed to the success of lake sturgeon restoration efforts," said Paul D'Amato, DEC Region 8 Regional Director. "This species of fish nearly disappeared from these waters, but thanks to the combined efforts of dedicated experts, lake sturgeon in the Genesee Rive now have a great chance to return to a healthy, thriving, self-sustaining population." Regional Director D'Amato noted the commitment and hard work of partners in this effort, including research ecologist Dr. Dawn Dittman of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center; Scott Schlueter, Fish and Wildlife Biologist of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Dr. Jeff Wyatt, Director of Animal Health and Conservation for the Seneca Park Zoo; and DEC staff. (October 3, 2013) The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC)   [more on Wildlife and the Genesee River in our area]
  • More good news for sturgeon  Approximately 10 years ago, federal, state, and university scientists took a gamble and reintroduced lake sturgeon into the Genesee River. They believed that the river's water quality and pollution levels had improved enough that the fish could survive, grow, and ultimately reproduce. And so far, they've been right. The fish are growing at good rates, fueled in part by diets of high-fat fly larvae and zebra mussels from the river bottom, says Jeff Wyatt, a University of Rochester professor and chief veterinarian for the Seneca Park Zoo. "It's all good news: that's the bottom line," Wyatt says. Wyatt and other researchers are also taking blood samples from the fish and testing them for heavy metals, pesticides, and PCBs. They're comparing them to samples from sturgeon in the unpolluted Oswegatchie River in the northern part of the state. (August 21, 2013) Rochester City Newspaper [more on Genesee River and Wildlife in our area]
  • Forum addresses health of Lake Ontario, Genesee River Experts say there's good and bad news Environmental experts spoke about the health of Lake Ontario, the Genesee River and the area’s huge surrounding watersheds Thursday during a 2013 Lake Ontario Ecosystem Forum at the Port of Rochester. They shared both good and bad news. Lake Ontario, the smallest of the five Great Lakes, is certainly in some environmental trouble. But the Genesee River, while still not recommended for swimming or fishing in, is showing signs of returning to health. Don Zelazny, Great Lakes program coordinator for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and Jeff Wyatt of the University of Rochester and the Seneca Park Zoo presented these different ecological aspects of the waterways. (August 16, 2013) Rochester Democrat and Chronicle [more on Great Lakes and Genesee River in our area]
  • Erica Bryant: Three-foot sturgeon found in Genesee Earlier this week, I called Jeff Wyatt to check up on local lake sturgeon, an endangered bottom-feeding species of fish with an uneven tail, long torpedo shape and bony back and side plates. I did not expect him to be at the 7th International Symposium on Sturgeon, because I did not realize there was a global gathering devoted to the well-being of these fish. As it turns out, hundreds of sturgeon supporters — including scientists, politicians, farmers and technologists from more than 35 countries — converged on Nanaimo, British Columbia, this week, all in the name of restoring the species. (July 26, 2013) Rochester Democrat and Chronicle [more on Genesee River and Wildlife in our area]

2012

2011

2010

2009

Swan and cygnet in Genesee River at the Port of Rochester

2007

  • Undredged river caused shallow Port - A survey of the Genesee River at the Port of Rochester this week found water depths have lessened as much as three feet in the past year, making the waterway more shallow. The U.S. Corps of Engineers survey, released today, found the outer channel between the river piers is among the most affected by sediment build up, or shoaling. Last month, the Stephen B. Roman, a cement boat and the only freighter still operating on the river, ran aground as it attempted to traverse the river. (April 4, 07) Democrat & Chronicle
  • Genesee River Dredging Funds Cut - 13WHAM.com - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will not dredge the Genesee River as planned this summer, because of federal budget cuts. The $920,000 funding cut came as a surprise to local officials and Charlotte residents, who did not learn of it until a major cargo ship got stuck in the mouth of the river last Thursday.  - (March 29, 2007) Home - 13WHAM.com
  • Silt levels of Genesee surveyed next week - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers doesn't expect to get a survey crew out on the Genesee River to measure the extent of shoaling at least until Monday. (March 29,07) Democrat & Chronicle

2006

  • Progress made in lakes cleanup - Oswego River off problem list, but Genesee remains— The Oswego River was officially removed from a binational list of the Great Lakes' most polluted tributaries Tuesday — the first American site to mark such a milestone. Meanwhile, the Genesee River, which appears on the same list of 43 polluted sites, needs several more years of effort before it can be considered healthy. (July 26, 2006) Democrat and Chronicle
  • SPRING CLEANING - Paul Noto knows all about big cleaning jobs. He's the operations manager for the city's environmental-services department. And this week, his department begins working on one of its more unusual assignments: cleaning the Genesee River. Each spring, environmental workers begin removing debris that collects in what the department calls "the river pool" --- the stretch of water from the Court Street dam north to the HighFalls. The debris consists mostly of trees and brush, drawn into the water by erosion from melting ice and strong currents along the river banks from as far south as the Mount Morris Dam. But there's more interesting stuff, too. (March 15, 2006) City Newspaper

2004

  •  Democrat & Chronicle: Genesee river current has a new spark — The Genesee River once drove the Rochester economy by powering flour mills. Now city officials want it to power a new emerging industry — fuel cell technology. The city has applied for a New York State Energy Research and Development Authority grant to study the feasibility of using the river and the 96-foot-high waterfalls downtown as a hydrogen source to power fuel cells. (April 11, 2004) Democrat and Chronicle

2003

  •  DEC Teaches Judges About Gorge - Few realize you'd have to go to Alaska to find the sort of unique fishing environment the Genesee River gorge offers. Its urban setting also make it a place for problems, not just fishing and gaming problems, but those involving alcohol and drugs. The DEC provided a guided tour of the gorge to five Rochester City Court judges Tuesday. (July 30, 2003) R News: Your NewsChannel

2002

2001

  • Federal funds to ease Great Lakes pollution The Genesee River and other waterways that feed into Lake Ontario could benefit from a federal bill that adds $250 million over the next five years for the prevention of Great Lakes pollution. (July 12, 2001) --DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE
  • Sunken Tugboat Leaking Fuel  The Department of Environmental Conservation is cleaning up an oily mess on the Genesee River, left behind when a tugboat sank.  (January 16, 2001) RNews. 
  • Grounded Tugboat Leaks Oil Into The Genesee Rochester, NY - Crews worked to clean up a small fuel oil leak from a grounded tugboat in the Genesee River near Charlotte on Monday. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation officials said the boat released about 200 gallons of oil into the river, but said the environmental impact of the spill will be minimal. DEC officials also said investigators had been working to determine the source of the spill for about a week. 
    (January 15, 2001) RochesterToday
  • Oil Spill Clean Up Continues The clean up of the oil spill in the Genesee River continues Monday. A sunken tug boat had been leaking fuel oil into the Genesee River, which can be seen over a two mile stretch. (January 15, 2001) WHEC

2000

1999

 


The Genesee River and the Lower Falls. Photo by Frank J. Regan.

Magnificent Lower Falls on the Genesee River.







 

(Above scripts from Dynamic Drive)

 

Genesee River Resources

Genesee River Resources on the Internet

  • Get studies on the Genesee River here, from Digital Commons @ Brockport
  • Genesee River Watershed Project Volume 2 Water Quality Analysis of the Upper Genesee River Watershed: Nutrient Concentration and Loading, Identification of Point and Nonpoint Sources of Pollution, Total Maximum Daily Load, and an Assessment of Management Practices using the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) Model
  • Genesee River Watershed Project. Water Quality Analysis of the Black Creek Watershed. Volume 4. Nutrient Concentration and Loading, Identification of Point and Nonpoint Sources of Pollution, Total Maximum Daily Load, and an Assessment of Management Practices using the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) Model. A report to the USDA.
  • Learn about Center for Environmental Initiatives' ‘Genesee RiverWatch Initiative’, a major effort to clean up our waters of the Genesee River, its tributaries and Lake Ontario. Rochester is considering many water-front development projects [Read: Water quality concerns for Rochester, NY’s Local Waterfront Revitalization Program] but to make these project viable the waters that run through them must be clean and healthy. 
  • Genesee River Wilds Project "The Genesee River Wilds Project is a coalition of groups and individuals who invest time, energy, funding, and other resources in the development of an environmentally sustainable system of natural parks concentrated along the Genesee River in the “Genesee River Wilds.”  This phrase refers to the Genesee River and its watershed from the river’s sources in Potter County, Pennsylvania, to the southern boundary of Letchworth State Park in New York State.  The Genesee River Wilds Project represents and partners with federal, state, county, municipal, and non-profit organizations; business corporations; educational institutions; landowners; farmers; anglers; hunters; hikers; mountain bikers; kayak and canoe enthusiasts; and many others who participate in various official and unofficial ways.  The coalition works to improve the health of the upper Genesee River and its watershed; protect them from future environmental threats; and enhance their recreational potential. "
  • Genesee River Watershed - NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation A brief overview of this watershed and its water quality
  • River Network - Home Page: River Network River Network's mission is to help people organize to protect and restore rivers and watersheds.
  • American Rivers: Celebrating 25 years of bringing rivers to life, American Rivers is North America's leading national river-conservation organization. Our mission is to
    protect and restore America's river systems and to foster a river stewardship ethic.
  • The World’s Water: a site dedicated to providing up-to-date water resources information and data, and connections to organizations, institutions, and individuals working on a wide range of global freshwater problems and solutions.
  • Genesee River - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Genesee River is a North American river flowing northward through the Twin Tiers of Pennsylvania and New York. Falls along the river are within the gorge of Letchworth State Park and within the city of Rochester. The Mount Morris Dam built in 1952 is the largest flood control dam east of the Mississippi River; its capacity was only exceeded in 1972 during Hurricane Agnes. The river provided the original power for the Rochester area, and 19th century mills along the river made Rochester one of the leading producers of flour in North America, earning the city one of its nicknames "Flour City".[3] The river still provides hydroelectric power for downtown Rochester to this day.